Category Archives: Blog

Using qla2xxx with LIO on Fedora

In addition to turning your Fedora 18 box into an iSCSI target, LIO also supports other SCSI transport layers (‘fabrics’), such as Fibre Channel, with the qla2xxx fabric.

The most crucial bit is to verify that the qla2xxx driver has initiator mode disabled — it should be operating in target mode only. You can check this with:

cat /sys/module/qla2xxx/parameters/qlini_mode

It should say ‘disabled’. If it doesn’t, create a file called /usr/lib/modprobe.d/qla2xxx.conf and put:

options qla2xxx qlini_mode=disabled

in it. Then, run ‘dracut -f’ to rebuild your initrd, and reboot.

Some of you may be wondering: why /usr/lib/modprobe.d instead of /etc/modprobe.d ? This is because qla2xxx is likely loaded from the kernel’s initial ramdisk (initrd), and dracut, the initrd building tool, omits “host-specific” settings in /etc/modprobe.d. While you’re mucking around, also make sure the firmware package for your qla device, such as ql2200-firmware or similar, is also installed.

targetcli won’t let you create a qla2xxx fabric if qlini_mode is wrong. Once it lets you create the qla fabric, you can add luns to it and grant access permissions to acls exactly in the same manner as the other LIO fabrics.

Oblivion’s Ending (SPOILERS)

Oblivion was a beautiful movie, but it was not a thoughtful one. The ending really made no sense and undercut it, in my opinion.

We learn during the film that Jack is one of innumerable clones, but for whatever reason, this Jack has a spark that has somehow captured the essence of the original. This lets his wife Julia reconnect with him after briefly being repulsed. Our Jack is special. This also makes his sacrifice to destroy the Tet have a price, which makes the sacrifice have meaning.

The last scene reunites another clone Jack with Julia. This is a guy who we have seen nothing of the entire movie, except getting his ass kicked by “our” Jack, number 47. Presumably there are hundreds more Jack clones on the planet after the Tet is destroyed, so why should that one be suited to immediately take the place of Original Jack or our Jack 47? Or did Jack 52 get imbued with Teh Special once Jack 47 died? I’m not sure, but it’s frustrating when just leaving Julia with Jack’s kid would’ve been a more consistent yet still positive ending for the movie.

Anyways. Some other quibbles:

  • I don’t care how much technology the Tet had, that sky house should’ve swayed like crazy in the wind!
  • Why was the Tet so short on spare parts?
  • How did Beech (Morgan Freeman) know the exact bit of the poem that Jack had read?
  • Why did the Tet start giving its Repairman Jacks more memories, compared to the Phase 1 Soldier Jacks (from the initial invasion as related by Beech)?
  • Wasn’t the whole cryochamber switcheroo thing a little gimmicky and cheap?
  • Tet could tell there was a body with Jack, but not its gender or age, and it couldn’t sense the bomb?

tgtd -> LIO kernel target in RHEL 7

RHEL 7 will be using the LIO kernel target subsystem for iSCSI and other protocols, instead of the tgtd daemon, aka scsi-target-utils. This is a change from RHEL 6, where we use tgtd for iSCSI target support, and LIO only for FCoE targets, via the fcoe-target-utils package.

Users of tgtd can prepare for RHEL 7 by trying Fedora 17 or 18, which have current LIO/targetcli code. LIO has many features tgtd doesn’t, but LIO also won’t cover 100% of tgtd’s features at first, either. File bugs for these regressions and we’ll work to address them.

Other software that currently uses tgtd may wish to look at the rtslib Python library, and targetcli’s JSON config format — LIO has a nice API so if you find yourself wanting to parse targetcli output, please hold off and email me instead, ok? :-)

scsi-target-utils will still be available via EPEL for RHEL 7, and supported in RHEL 6 for its lifetime.

Plumbing needs an API: “libification”

Here are my slides and video from my talk “All Plumbing needs an API” from Linux Plumbers Conference 2012.

My thesis is we would improve the quality of our platform if we recognize the flaws in excessive use of other commandline tools by other tools, and worked towards more APIs and libraries for low-level parts of the Linux platform. There are many reasons given in the talk I don’t want to rehash; here are some more thoughts since I gave the talk:

First, this is not a push for every single instance of one program being called by another to be replaced by an API. But on the spectrum of cmdline-parsing vs libraries, I think we are too far towards the former, and should make an effort to shift dramatically towards the latter.

Second, we can take a “pave the cowpaths” approach toward this — we should first libify those tools most commonly parsed by other tools. I’ve been helping out on liblvm, a library for LVM (whose tools are unquestionably over-parsed.) There are also many other network, storage, and system configuration tools that are candidates for libification.

The move towards virtualization & cloud computing has led to many tools formerly configured directly by the sysadmin now being configured by other tools. Broadening the coverage of our system-level management APIs will improve Linux’s flexibility and reliability as a virtualized OS.

Screencast: targetd and lsmcli

I’ve whipped up a short (7min) screencast on targetd and lsmcli, two new additions to Fedora 18. targetd glues together LVM and LIO to expose a remote API for configuring a system for a storage array role. lsmcli is part of libstoragemgmt, which provides a common way to manage storage arrays from multiple vendors.

python-kmod will be in Fedora 18

python-kmod is a basic Python wrapper around the kmod library. It allows you to load, unload, and view Linux kernel modules without resorting to the subprocess module.

If you have Python code that works with kernel modules, please consider using this library in the future. If you have C code that works with modules, you should use libkmod directly! As I’ll be talking about at this years LPC, proper libraries are preferable to calling cmdline progams for low-level stuff, and now there’s one less reason to do so.

Using python-kmod, python-rtslib (and thus targetcli and targetd) now work with no use of subprocess, although rtslib will fall back to modprobe via subprocess if python-kmod is not present.

Thanks to Jiri Popelka for reviewing the python-kmod package, sorry it took me so long to fix it up :)

targetd update: 0.2.2

targetd is up to version 0.2.2 from 0.1, just five weeks later.

  • Added manpage
  • Added API specification. API support for multiple storage pools.
  • Deferred completion for long-running operations
  • Volume copy
  • Config file format changed to YAML
  • Saves configuration across reboots
  • Packaged, submitted for inclusion, and accepted for Fedora 18

If you are interested in contributing to targetd, there are two things you could help with. First, now that we have an API specification, please review it and give feedback or submit a bug.

Second, I’m having trouble implementing SSL support. I searched around and found some pages that talked about easily adding SSL support to Python’s HTTPServer, but after spending a day on it, it still didn’t work. I’m sure this is easy for someone, but that someone is not me :-) Anyone care to take a look?

targetd: remote administration of a Linux storage appliance

targetd is a new service that will make it easier to configure Linux machines to export block-based volumes over iSCSI or other protocol.

The Why

Virtual machines need disk images to run from. While you can put the disk image on the local storage of the machine executing the VM, there are many benefits to centralizing disk images — this lets you seamlessly migrate the VM’s execution between machines, is easier to manage, and can be more space-efficient when many of the disk images are almost the same, which is pretty common.

However, it hasn’t been nearly as easy to provision a new storage volume on the central storage box as it could be. High-end storage appliances have tools for this, but the normal way using only open-source tools has been to ssh into the machine, create the new volume and export it using command–line tools, and then go back to however you’re creating the new VM and tell it about the new volume you created.

targetd is a step towards making this process a little easier.

The What

The remote API is based on jsonrpc-2.0 over HTTP. The Python standard library does much of the work towards implementing our API server, what’s left is the actual implementation of functionality and the jsonrpc error handling.

This API will let targetd eventually tie into existing storage management tools. One such under development is libstoragemgmt, a framework by my colleague Tony Asleson, which will give virtualization tools like oVirt or OpenStack a common API for management of the many proprietary storage appliances, and also open-source appliances like targetd.

Linux has had reliable LVM-based volume management for a long time, and now has an excellent kernel-based storage target subsystem called LIO. targetd uses both of these heavily. In configuring a machine for a storage appliance role, give targetd a volume group to allocate volumes from, set user/password for access, and you’re just about done.

There is one coding pet peeve of mine that I’ve ranted about before that targetd avoids completely. targetd uses libraries to interface with LVM and LIO instead of the all-too-common alternative of passing commands to command-line tools, and parsing the output. Much of the time spent towards targetd was improving these libraries. I believe proper error propagation, reduced text parsing, and better library APIs make this bottom-up approach a long-term win.

Current state and future plans

Today’s announcement is a pre-alpha 0.1 release. I’m really hoping to get to 1.0 for Fedora 18. There is a manpage to write and SSL support to add, but much more important than the source code of  targetd is the layout of the remote API itself. I’d love to get some more review of that, as well as the code, before 1.0. I have been working from what I believe are some common use-cases, but more feedback on how admins configure and use storage appliances would be most welcome too!

Please see the project on github for more info.

Shorter trackpad-disabling timeout with Gnome 3 (Fedora 17)

Gnome 3 has the option of disabling the trackpad while the user is typing. (System Settings -> Mouse and Touchpad -> Touchpad) However, it uses a timeout of two seconds. Two seconds doesn’t sound like much, but it may be enough to feel weird — at least it did for me.

When you check that option, all Gnome is doing is running a utility called “syndaemon”, and it uses a 2 second timeout. We can adjust the timeout by running this ourselves when we login:

  1. Make sure Gnome doesn’t also run syndaemon by keeping the aforementioned checkbox unchecked
  2. Run gnome-session-properties, after entering alt-F2 or from the commandline.
  3. Click Add, and then enter Syndaemon, /usr/bin/syndaemon -i 0.5 -K -R, and any comment you want
  4. Click Save.
  5. Logout and back in

If you run “ps ax|grep synd” you will see syndaemon has been started with your settings. 0.5 seconds works for me but feel free to experiment.